in

Podcast: A matter of a piñon

Podcast A matter of a pinon



Tall, bushy, spiny and fragrant, the pinyon pine is a beloved feature of the Mountain West — and not just for its beauty. The tiny piñon nuts in the tree’s cones are so good, people in the region have eaten them every fall for countless generations. But as climate change continues to affect the United States, something terrible is happening. The piñon harvest is getting smaller and smaller.

Today we go to New Mexico, where the pinyon is the state’s official tree. We talk to Axios race and justice reporter Russell Contreras, who’s based out of Albuquerque and has an up-close view of the piñon’s slow disappearance. And a native New Mexican tells us about the nut and tree’s cultural importance.

Host: Gustavo Arellano

Guests: Axios race and justice reporter Russell Contreras and Smithsonian Institution American Women’s History Initiative director Tey Marianna Nunn

More reading:

Op-Ed: Pinyon and juniper woodlands define the West. Why is the BLM turning them to mulch?

Locally foraged piñon nuts are cherished in New Mexico. They’re also disappearing

Pine nut recipes: From small seeds, inspiration





Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

GIPHY App Key not set. Please check settings

Despite vows Biden hasnt lifted Trump sanctions on Cuba

Despite vows, Biden hasn’t lifted Trump sanctions on Cuba

Pelosi push on Biden infrastructure bill is a political test

Pelosi push on Biden infrastructure bill is a political test